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Can you Really Tell the Difference in Air Quality when you Replace your Air Filters?

Difference in Air Quality when you Replace your Air Filters

Yes, you can really tell the difference in air quality when you replace your home’s air filters.

One of the main things that people with home HVAC systems are told, is to regularly replace their air filters. We know that we say it time and time again, but many homeowners still don’t seem to keep up with the task. We will say it again, changing your Western New York home’s air filters is important. In case you are still skeptical about the need, we are going to review how much of a difference replacing your air filters can make on your home’s air quality.

Not only can keeping clean air filters prolong the lifespan of your HVAC system, it can also highly impact the air that you and your family breathe. We are going to tackle the question that you are likely wondering, “Can you really tell the difference in air quality when you replace your air filters?”

Can you Really Tell the Difference in Air Quality when you Replace your Air Filters?

The answer to this question is rather simple. Yes, you can really tell the difference in air quality when you replace your home’s air filters.

According to the EPA, the most effective ways to improve your indoor air quality are to reduce or remove the sources of pollutants and to ventilate with clean outdoor air. In addition, research shows that filtration can be an effective supplement to source control and ventilation. Maintaining the air filters in your furnace and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can help to improve indoor air quality. HVAC filters are designed to filter air throughout a home. HVAC filters can reduce indoor air pollution.

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) refers to the air quality within and around buildings and structures, especially as it relates to the health and comfort of building occupants (EPA). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has identified poor indoor air quality as both a short- and long-term health risk to American homeowners. Poor indoor air quality and household pollutants can come from various sources. Many experts believe that poor indoor air quality is a major contributor to indoor allergy symptoms, the spread of illness, and poor breathing.

Even if you don’t suspect a problem, replacing your air filters helps to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) and allows you and your family to breathe air that has less pollutants and other allergens. Your air filter absorbs unwanted particles, to keep your air clean; however, if the air filter is dirty or soiled, it will not perform as it should, and your air will not be up to quality standards.

How Often Should you Change your Air Filters?

Air filters live up to their name. To put it simply, they filter your air. When you change your air filters regularly, it helps remove harmful particles from the air such as pollen, dust, dust mites, mold, bacteria, micro allergens and more. Removing these harmful pollutants has enormous health benefits for you and your family.

There is a difference in air quality when you replace your air filters, so you should change them as often as you think it is needed. We recommend changing your air filters at least once a month, but there is no exact number of days in which you should change your filters, as each home is different and it depends on the strain you put on your filters, what particles are in the air, and also what types of filters you have.

Nothing is more important than the air we breathe, that’s why regularly changing your home’s air filters is so important.

At Duffett Plumbing, Heating & AC we are indoor air quality experts. While replacing your air filters is step one to better IAQ, even better air can start by contacting our team.

The team at Duffett specializes in a whole range of IAQ services, including installing air scrubbers and purifiers that are proven to clean the air in your home.

With our help, you can remove these contaminants from your home’s air: viruses, bacterial, mold particles, dust, pollen, pet dander, and more.